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The Illustrated War News, Number 15, Nov. 18, 1914

The Illustrated War News, Number 15, Nov. 18, 1914
Category: Periodicals
Author: Various
Title: The Illustrated War News, Number 15, Nov. 18, 1914
Release Date: 2006-05-07
Type book: Text
Copyright Status: Public domain in the USA.
Date added: 25 March 2019
Count views: 19
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THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS
PART 15

THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS EACH NUMBER COMPLETE IN ITSELF NOVEMBER 18, 1914
THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS PART 15
PRICE SIXPENCE: BY INLAND POST, SIXPENCE HALFPENNY. PUBLISHING OFFICE: 172, STRAND, LONDON, W.C.
REGISTERED AS A NEWSPAPER FOR TRANSMISSION IN THE UNITED KINGDOM,AND TO CANADA AND NEWFOUNDLAND BY MAGAZINE POST.

THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS, NOV. 18, 1914—II

A
Close
Shave

—but in comfort with a Durham-DuplexRazor Safety, the razor which enables youto shave with the barber's diagonal strokewithout fear of cutting yourself. As a gift to aman friend nothing is more appreciated. Soldiersat home and abroad will delight in an outfit.

RAZOR SAFETY

The interchangeabledouble-edged bladeswill last a campaignand always give an easyshave under the mosttrying conditions.

Complete Outfits—

10/6 and 21/- (as shown).

Working Model with oneBlade, 2/6.

Exchangeable free.

Booklet post free fromDURHAM-DUPLEX RAZOR Co., Ltd.,27w, Church St., Sheffield.

Player's Navy Cut

Tobacco and Cigarettes
FOR THE TROOPS.
 
From all quarters we hear the same simple request:
"SEND US TOBACCO AND CIGARETTES"

TROOPS AT HOME (Duty Paid)

It would be well if those wishing to send Tobacco or Cigarettes to our soldiers would remember those still in Great Britain. There are thousands of Regulars and Territorials awaiting orders and in sending a present now you are assured of reaching your man.

Supplies may be obtained from the usual trade sources and we shall be glad to furnish any information on application.

TROOPS AT THE FRONT (Duty Free)

John Player & Sons, Nottingham, will (through the Proprietors for Export, The British-American Tobacco Co., Ltd.) be pleased to arrange for supplies of these world-renowned Brands to be forwarded to the Front at Duty Free Rates.

JOHN PLAYER & SONS,
Castle Tobacco Factory, Nottingham.
P.438 Branch of The Imperial Tobacco Co. (of Gt. Britain & Ireland), Ltd.

THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS, NOV. 18, 1914—1

The Illustrated War News.

AS USED IN THE GERMAN TRENCHES: A GERMAN BAND PLAYING ONTHE MARCH DURING THE WAR.

Photo. Alfieri.

AS USED IN THE GERMAN TRENCHES: A GERMAN BAND PLAYING ONTHE MARCH DURING THE WAR.

2—THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS, NOV. 18, 1914.

THE GREAT WAR.


Our gracious Sovereign—more so even than his deceased father, who hadalso a conspicuous gift that way—has ever shown a singular felicityin voicing the sentiments of his people, but never more so than whenhe sent this message to Sir John French: "The splendid pluck, spirit,and endurance shown by my troops in the desperate fighting which hascontinued for so many days against vastly superior forces fills me withadmiration." That sovereign message to his heroic soldiers—such as hisancestor Henry V. might have addressed to his 10,000 long-enduringconquerors on the night of Agincourt—was nobly supplemented by thispassage from the following day's Speech from the Throne: "My Navy andArmy continue, throughout the area of conflict, to maintain in fullmeasure their glorious traditions. We watch and follow theirsteadfastness and valour with thankfulness and pride, and there is,throughout my Empire, a fixed determination to secure, at whateversacrifice, the triumph of our arms and the vindication of our cause."

COMMANDER OF THE BRITISH CRUISER WHICH 'IMPRISONED' THE  'KNIGSBERG': CAPTAIN SIDNEY R. DRURY-LOWE, R.N.

COMMANDER OF THE BRITISH CRUISER WHICH "IMPRISONED" THE "KNIGSBERG": CAPTAIN SIDNEY R. DRURY-LOWE, R.N.

The Admiralty stated on Nov. 11, "This search resulted on Oct. 30 in the 'Knigsberg' being discovered by H.M.S. 'Chatham' (Captain Sidney R. Drury-Lowe, R.N.) hiding in shoal water about six miles up the Rufigi Ritter.... (German East Africa) ... She is now imprisoned, and unable to do any further harm."—[Photo. by Elliott and Fry.]

COMMANDER OF THE AUSTRALIAN CRUISER WHICH DESTROYED THE "EMDEN": CAPTAIN JOHN C.T. GLOSSOP, R.N.

COMMANDER OF THE AUSTRALIANCRUISER WHICH DESTROYED THE"EMDEN": CAPTAIN JOHN C.T.GLOSSOP, R.N.

Captain Glossop received the following message from the First Lord ofthe Admiralty: "Warmest congratulations on the brilliant entry of theAustralian Navy into the war, and the signal service rendered to theAllied cause and to peaceful commerce by the destruction of the'Emden.'"

Photograph by Lafayette.

ONE OF THE VESSELS CONCERNED IN "THE LARGE COMBINED OPERATION" AGAINST THE "EMDEN" H.M.A.S. "MELBOURNE."

ONE OF THE VESSELS CONCERNED IN "THE LARGE COMBINED OPERATION" AGAINST THE "EMDEN" H.M.A.S. "MELBOURNE."

While it fell to H.M.A.S. "Sydney" to bring the "Emden" to action,another vessel of the Australian Navy, the "Melbourne," also joined inthe pursuit. The Admiralty stated that a "large combined operation byfast cruisers against the 'Emden' has been for some time in progress.In this search, which covered an immense area, the British cruisers havebeen aided by French, Russian, and Japanese vessels working in harmony.H.M.A.S. 'Melbourne' and 'Sydney' were also included in thesemovements."

Photograph by Sport and General.

At whatever sacrifice! And that promises to be terrible. For what willbe the sacrifice entailed by two years of war—to put its duration ata moderate estimate—if our casualties in life and limb alone (comparedwith which our millions of money are as nothing) amounted, according toan official statement in Parliament, to about 57,000 of all ranks upto the end of October, and it is believed that 10,000 at least must beadded for the first ten days of November? Of course, by far the largerportion of those casualties are "wounded," of whom, according to one ofthe Netley authorities, nine in ten at least ought to recover; whilethose casualties also include "missing," or "prisoners," of whom theGermans claim to have now more than 16,000 in their keeping. In theBoer War our "wounded" amounted to 22,829,of which only 2018 proved fatal cases; while our total casualties forover two and a-half years of warfare, including 13,250 deaths fromdisease—which, in every campaign, is always far more fatal than leador steel—figured up to 52,204, as compared with 57,000 in France andBelgium for only three months, or considerably more than twice thenumber of men (26,000) whom we landed in the Crimea; while the purelyBritish contingent of Wellington's "Allies" at Waterloo was returnedat something like 24,000.

[Continued overleaf.

THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS, NOV. 18, 1914—3

SYBARITISM IN THE TRENCHES! A HOT SHOWER-BATH ESTABLISHMENT INSTALLED BY AN INGENIOUS FRENCH ENGINEER.

SYBARITISM IN THE TRENCHES! A HOT SHOWER-BATHESTABLISHMENT INSTALLED BY AN INGENIOUS FRENCH ENGINEER.

Much has been said of the elaborate character of the Germanentrenchments, and of the British genius for comfort developed in ourown lines, but it is doubtful whether anything done by either side inthat direction has surpassed the chef-d'oeuvre of an ingeniousFrench engineer shown in our illustration. At one point in the Frenchtrenches not seven hundred yards from those of the enemy, and withintwo miles of the German artillery, he constructed an up-to-date bathingestablishment, with a heating apparatus and a shower-bath! The apartmentwas fitted with a stove, benches, clothes-pegs, and curtains; andadjoining the salle de douches, or shower-bath room, was fittedup a salle de coiffure. There was even talk of enlivening thebathing hour with music and a topical revue.

4—THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS, NOV. 18, 1914.

SIMILAR TO THE KAISER'S AERIAL BODYGUARD: A ZEPPELIN WITH A GUN ON TOP FIRING AT HOSTILE AEROPLANES--A GERMAN PICTURE.

SIMILAR TO THE KAISER'S AERIAL BODYGUARD: A ZEPPELIN WITHA GUN ON TOP FIRING AT HOSTILE AEROPLANES—A GERMAN PICTURE.

It was stated recently that two Zeppelins, armed with machine-guns,circle continually on guard above the Kaiser's private apartments in hisheadquarters at Coblentz.

It must be remembered, too, that the casualties referred to—beingconfined to "the western area of the war"—do not include our losses atsea, which comprise few "wounded" and no "missing." At sea it is eitherneck or nothing, sink or swim: a modern battle-ship, if holed andexploded, like the Good Hope and the Monmouth off thecoast of Chile, going to the bottom, and most of her crew with her, likeKempenfelt's oaken Royal George

Brave Kempenfelt is gone,

His victories are o'er;

And he and his eight hundred

Will plough the waves no more.

Thus if our casualties at sea, which are mainly of one kind only, beadded up, they will probably be found to exceed our deaths on land,which are always much less numerous than other kinds of losses; yet themortality of our battlefields has been mournful enough, especially amongofficers—where the death percentage has been higher than in any otherwar we ever waged.

On the other hand, the Germans have had to pay a fearful price forthe death-toll they have exacted of us and our Allies, seeing that,according to their own official admission, their casualties to the endof September amounted to over 500,000 for the Prussian army alone, whilethe corresponding figures for Bavaria, Wrtemberg, Baden, and otherStates have to be added; so that the estimate of Mr. Hilaire Belloc thatthe total losses of the Germans up to date must be somewhere near amillion and three-quarters men would appear to be not very far out.

Well now, supposing that the war were to last for two years, it followsthat, at the same rate of loss, the German casualties would amount to12,250,000, which is almost unthinkable. Its very destructiveness shouldtend to shorten the duration of this terrible war. As Mr. Asquith saidat the opening of Parliament, in a curiously cryptic and significantpassage: "The war may last long. I doubt myself if it will last as longas many people originally predicted." God grant that this may be so!

But in the meantime there are no signs of any abatement of fury on thepart of the Imperial Hun of Berlin, who stamps, and struts, and rageslike Pistol on the field of Agincourt; and "Bid

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