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The Illustrated War News, Number 21, Dec. 30, 1914

The Illustrated War News, Number 21, Dec. 30, 1914
Category: Periodicals
Author: Various
Title: The Illustrated War News, Number 21, Dec. 30, 1914
Release Date: 2006-05-07
Type book: Text
Copyright Status: Public domain in the USA.
Date added: 25 March 2019
Count views: 12
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THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS
PART 21

N.B.—REMOVE INSETTED LEAFLET BEFORE POSTING THIS ISSUE. EACH NUMBER COMPLETE IN ITSELF THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS
DEC. 30, 1914
THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS PART 21
PRICE SIXPENCE: BY INLAND POST, SIXPENCE HALFPENNY. PUBLISHING OFFICE: 172, STRAND, LONDON, W.C.
REGISTERED AS A NEWSPAPER FOR TRANSMISSION IN THE UNITED KINGDOM,AND TO CANADA AND NEWFOUNDLAND BY MAGAZINE POST.

THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS, DEC. 30, 1914—[PART 21]—II

THE
Illustrated War News

PUBLISHED ON WEDNESDAY MORNINGS—SIXPENCE.

========

Part 12 Completed the First Volume
of "The Illustrated War News."

A HANDSOME
BINDING COVER

for VOLUME I.

IN HALF-MOROCCO

NOW READY, to hold 12 Parts of this Popular Publication.

Price 3/- with Title-page. Post free 3d. extra.

Or can be obtained through all Newsagents and Railway Bookstalls.

The COMPLETE VOLUME, Beautifully Bound in Half-Morocco, Price 10/6

========

Publishing Office: 172, Strand, W.C. Editorial Office: Milford Lane, Strand, W.C.

Player's Navy Cut

Tobacco and Cigarettes
FOR THE TROOPS.
 
From all quarters we hear the same simple request:
"SEND US TOBACCO AND CIGARETTES"

TROOPS AT HOME (Duty Paid)

It would be well if those wishing to send Tobacco or Cigarettes to our soldiers would remember those still in Great Britain. There are thousands of Regulars and Territorials awaiting orders and in sending a present now you are assured of reaching your man.

Supplies may be obtained from the usual trade sources and we shall be glad to furnish any information on application.

TROOPS AT THE FRONT (Duty Free)

John Player & Sons, Nottingham, will (through the Proprietors for Export, The British-American Tobacco Co., Ltd.) be pleased to arrange for supplies of these world-renowned Brands to be forwarded to the Front at Duty Free Rates.

JOHN PLAYER & SONS,
Castle Tobacco Factory, Nottingham.
P.438 Branch of The Imperial Tobacco Co. (of Gt. Britain & Ireland), Ltd.

THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS, DEC. 30, 1914—[PART 21]—1

The Illustrated War News.

ONE OF THE BRITISH SHIPS WHICH SANK VON SPEE'S SQUADRON OFF THEFALKLANDS: THE BATTLE-CRUISER "INVINCIBLE"

Photo. Cribb.

ONE OF THE BRITISH SHIPS WHICH SANK VON SPEE'S SQUADRON OFF THEFALKLANDS: THE BATTLE-CRUISER "INVINCIBLE"

2—THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS, DEC. 30, 1914—[PART 21].

THE GREAT WAR.


In reviewing the events of the last week throughout the world-wide area ofwar, let us begin with the Dark Continent, where everything went in ourfavour—very brilliantly so. First of all, then, we may now be said tohave completed our conquest of the German Cameroon country by takingpossession of the whole of the railway which runs northward from Bonabari,and is now in the hands of our troops. A similar fate is reserved, at nodistant date, for German South Africa, against which General Botha—a manno less brave and dashing as a soldier than sagacious as a statesman—ispreparing to lead a conquering force. Having stamped out the rebellionwithin the Union itself—crushing it literally like a beetle—he is nowaddressing himself to the task—a harder one, perhaps, but still certainof achievement—of making an end of the bad neighbourhood of the Germansin the vast region forming the Hinterland of Lderitz Bay, which isalready in our possession, and rendering it impossible for them in thefuture to intrigue from that quarter against the peace and stability ofthe Union. The court-martialling and prompt execution at Pretoria ofthe rebel leader, Captain Fourie, shows what the Union Government isminded to do pour dcourager les autres. The rebellion was promptlyand energetically suppressed—though not without a Union loss of 334,including more than 100 deaths; while in German South Africa, thecasualties had also risen to a total of some 370. The rebels had more than170 killed, over 300 wounded, and 5500 prisoners—which was thus a verycreditable bit of work, as brilliant as it was brief, in the rounding-upof rebels against the unity of the Empire.

SPOKESMAN OF FRENCH DETERMINATION: M. VIVIANI, PREMIER OF FRANCE.

SPOKESMAN OF FRENCH DETERMINATION: M. VIVIANI, PREMIER OF FRANCE.

At the opening of the French Chamber on the 22nd, M. Viviani, the Premier,expressed the national resolve to continue the war till the cause of theAllies is won.—[Photo. Topical.]

APPOINTED COMMANDER-IN-CHIEF AT THE NORE: ADMIRAL CALLAGHAN.

APPOINTED COMMANDER-IN-CHIEF AT THE NORE: ADMIRAL CALLAGHAN.

Admiral Sir George Callaghan was Commander-in-Chief of the Home Fleet from1911 till the war began. He has since been on the War Staff at theAdmiralty.—[Photo. Heath.]

GERMAN PRAISE OF THE BRITISH SOLDIER: GENERAL VON HEERINGEN.

GERMAN PRAISE OF THE BRITISH SOLDIER: GENERAL VON HEERINGEN.

Interviewed recently, General von Heeringen said: "The English first-linetroops are splendid soldiers, experienced and very tough, especially onthe defensive."—[Photo. Bain.]

Quite of a piece with the doing of this job in South Africa was thedisposal of another overt enemy against our authority at the otherextremity of the Dark Continent—in the person of the Khedive, Abbas II.,who has now been replaced by Prince Hussein Kamel Pasha as the nominalSultan of Egypt—under our protection and power. No change of the kind wasever brought about with so much statesmanlike wisdom and such littlefriction, or with so much hearty approval from all sides—except, ofcourse, that of the Turks and their German backers, for whom the change ofregime, effected as it was by a simple stroke of Sir Edward Grey'smasterly pen, was a most painful slap. The exchange of messages betweenKing George and Prince Hussein—one promising unfailing support, andthe other unfailing allegiance—completed the transaction, one of thegreatest triumphs of British statesmanship, compared with which the recentstatecraft of the Germans is mere amateur bungling. Marshal von der GoltzPasha, who has now exchanged his Governorship of Belgium for the positionof chief military counsellor on the Bosphorus, will find it harder thanever—with his rabble army under Djemal Pasha—to "liberate" from theBritish yoke the people of Egypt, who have already shown that they no moreyearn for such emancipation than our loyal fellow-subjects in India.

(Continued overleaf.)

THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS, DEC. 30, 1914—[PART 21]—3

CHRISTMAS DECORATIONS ON A BRITISH WAR-SHIP: EVERGREENS FOR THE MASTHEAD.
THE COMMANDER-IN-CHIEF OF THE GRAND FLEET AT SEA: ADMIRAL JELLICOE.

CHRISTMAS DECORATIONS ON A BRITISH WAR-SHIP: EVERGREENS FOR THE MASTHEAD.

THE COMMANDER-IN-CHIEF OF THE GRAND FLEET AT SEA: ADMIRAL JELLICOE.

Christmas celebrations in the Navy were naturally curtailed this year, buteven in time of war the festival is observed to some extent, under thelimitations caused by the necessity of being ready for immediate action.That the Navy did not allow Christmas festivities to interfere with dutyis shown by the brilliant air-raid on Cuxhaven on Christmas morning. TheGrand Fleet which keeps its silent watch on the seas, under AdmiralJellicoe, did not, we may be sure, relax any of its vigilance. One of theChristmas customs in the Navy is to decorate the mastheads with holly,mistletoe, or evergreens. The mess-room tables are also decorated, and theofficers walk in procession through the messes, the Captain sampling thefare.—[Photos. by Newspaper Illustrations and Alfieri.]

4—THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS, DEC. 30, 1914—[PART 21].

A GERMAN ISLAND ADDED TO THE EMPIRE BY THE AUSTRALIANFORCES: READING THE BRITISH PROCLAMATION AT RABAUL, NEU POMMERN.

A GERMAN ISLAND ADDED TO THE EMPIRE BY THE AUSTRALIANFORCES: READING THE BRITISH PROCLAMATION AT RABAUL, NEU POMMERN.

The Australian Squadron arrived at Herbertshhe, Neu Pommern, on September11. After some fighting, the Germans surrendered, and, two days later, theUnion Jack was hoisted at Rabaul, the German capital. The proclamation wasread by Major Francis Heritage (facing Colonel W. Holmes, the centralfigure in the photograph). For the benefit of the natives an address wasgiven in amusing "pidgin" English (see the "Times," November 16). NeuPommern (formerly New Britain) is just east of New Guinea.

At Constantinople it was given out that the Messudiyeh, sunk by oneof our submarines in the Dardanelles, had simply been the victim of a"leak"; but so serious was this little "rift within the lute" that itsauthor, Lieut.-Commander Holbrook, R.N., was awarded a V.C. for hissplendid deed of daring—a very different kind of act from the Germanbombardment of undefended towns on our East Coast, which caused our FirstLord of the Admiralty to write to the Mayor of Scarborough—and his wordsdeserve to be here repeated and recorded—that "nothing proves moreplainly the effectiveness of British naval pressure than the frenzy ofhatred aroused against us in the breasts of the enemy.... Their hate isthe measure of their fear.... Whatever feats of arms the German Navy

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