» » The Book of the Homeless (Le livre des sans-foyer)

The Book of the Homeless (Le livre des sans-foyer)

The Book of the Homeless (Le livre des sans-foyer)
Category:
Title: The Book of the Homeless (Le livre des sans-foyer)
Release Date: 2018-07-27
Type book: Text
Copyright Status: Public domain in the USA.
Date added: 27 March 2019
Count views: 89
Read book
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 ... 21

Contents.

List of Illustrations
(In certain versions of this etext [in certain browsers]clicking on the image will bring up a larger version.)

(etext transcriber's note)

[Imageof the book's cover unavailable.]

{i} 

{ii} 

{iii} 

THE BOOK OF THE HOMELESS

THE BOOK OF THE
HOMELESS

(Le Livre des Sans-Foyer)
EDITED BY
EDITH WHARTON
New York & London
MDCCCCXVI

{iv} 

{v} 

[Image of title page unavailable.]

THE
BOOK OF THE HOMELESS

(LE LIVRE DES SANS-FOYER)
EDITED BY EDITH WHARTON
.    .
.
Original Articles in Verse and Prose
Illustrations reproduced from Original Paintings & Drawings


THE BOOK IS SOLD
FOR THE BENEFIT OF THE AMERICAN HOSTELS FOR REFUGEES
(WITH THE FOYER FRANCO-BELGE)
AND OF THE CHILDREN OF FLANDERS RESCUE COMMITTEE

NEW YORK
CHARLES SCRIBNER’S SONS
MDCCCCXVI
{vi} 
COPYRIGHT, 1916, BY CHARLES SCRIBNER’S SONS
D. B. UPDIKE, THE MERRYMOUNT PRESS, BOSTON, U. S. A.

{vii} 

LETTRE DU GÉNÉRAL JOFFRE

République Française

Armées de l’Est
Le Commandant en Chef
Au Grand Quartier Général, le 18 Août, 1915

Les Etats-Unis d’Amérique n’ont pas oublié que la première page del’Histoire de leur indépendance a été écrite avec un peu de sangfrançais.

Par leur inépuisable générosité et leur grande sympathie, ils apportentaujourd’hui à la France, qui combat pour sa liberté, l’aide la plusprécieuse et le plus puissant réconfort.

J. Joffre
{viii}

LETTER FROM GENERAL JOFFRE
[TRANSLATION]

Headquarters of the Commander-in-chief
of the Armies of the French Republic

August 18ᵗʰ 1915

The United States of America have never forgotten that the first pageof the history of their independence was partly written in Frenchblood.

Inexhaustibly generous and profoundly sympathetic, these same UnitedStates now bring aid and solace to France in the hour of her strugglefor liberty.

J. Joffre

{ix}

INTRODUCTION

It is not only a pleasure but a duty to write the introduction whichMrs. Wharton requests for “The Book of the Homeless.” At the outset ofthis war I said that hideous though the atrocities had been and dreadfulthough the suffering, yet we must not believe that these atrocities andthis suffering paralleled the dreadful condition that had obtained inEuropean warfare during, for example, the seventeenth century. It islamentable to have to confess that I was probably in error. The fatethat has befallen Belgium is as terrible as any that befell thecountries of Middle Europe during the Thirty Years’ War and the wars ofthe following half-century. There is no higher duty than to care for therefugees and above all the child refugees who have fled from Belgium.This book is being sold for the benefit of the American Hostels forRefugees and for the benefit of The Children of Flanders ReliefCommittee, founded in Paris by Mrs. Wharton in November, 1914, andenlarged by her in April, 1915, and chiefly maintained hitherto byAmerican subscriptions. My daughter, who in November and December lastwas in Paris with her husband, Dr. Derby, in connection with theAmerican Ambulance, has told me much about the harrowing tragedies ofthe poor souls who were driven from their country and on the verge ofstarvation, without food or shelter, without hope, and with the membersof the family all separated from one another, none knowing where theothers were to be found, and who had drifted into Paris and into otherparts of France and across the Channel to England as a result of Belgiumbeing trampled into bloody mire. In April last the Belgian Governmentasked Mrs. Wharton to take charge of some six hundred and fifty childrenand a number of helpless old men and women from the ruined towns andfarms of Flanders. This is{x} the effort which has now turned into TheChildren of Flanders Rescue Committee.

I appeal to the American people to picture to themselves the plight ofthese poor creatures and to endeavor in practical fashion to secure thatthey shall be saved from further avoidable suffering. Nothing that ourpeople can do will remedy the frightful wrong that has been committed onthese families. Nothing that can now be done by the civilized world,even if the neutral nations of the civilized world should at last wakeup to the performance of the duty they have so shamefully failed toperform, can undo the dreadful wrong of which these unhappy children,these old men and women, have been the victims. All that can be donesurely should be done to ease their suffering. The part that America hasplayed in this great tragedy is not an exalted part; and there is allthe more reason why Americans should hold up the hands of those of theirnumber who, like Mrs. Wharton, are endeavoring to some extent to remedythe national shortcomings. We owe to Mrs. Wharton all the assistance wecan give. We owe this assistance to the good name of America, and aboveall for the cause of humanity we owe it to the children, the women andthe old men who have suffered such dreadful wrong for absolutely nofault of theirs.

Theodore Roosevelt
{xi}

TABLE OF CONTENTS

CONTRIBUTIONS OF WRITERS AND MUSICIANS

 PAGE
MAURICE BARRÈS
Les Frères59
Translation: The Brothers61
SARAH BERNHARDT
Une Promesse64
Translation: A Promise64
LAURENCE BINYON
The Orphans of Flanders. Poem3
PAUL BOURGET
Après un An65
Translation: One Year Later67
RUPERT BROOKE
The Dance. A Song4
PAUL CLAUDEL
Le Précieux Sang. Poem5
Translation: The Precious Blood6
JEAN COCTEAU
La Mort des Jeunes Gens de la Divine Hellade. Fragment. Poem9
{xii}Translation: How the Young Men died in Hellas. A Fragment11
JOSEPH CONRAD
Poland Revisited71
VINCENT D’INDY
Musical Score: La légende de Saint Christophe (Acte I, Sc. III)55
ELEONORA DUSE
Libertà nella Vita98
Translation: The Right to Liberty98
JOHN GALSWORTHY
Harvest99
EDMUND GOSSE
The Arrogance and Servility of Germany101
ROBERT GRANT
A Message. Poem14
THOMAS HARDY
Cry of the Homeless. Poem16
PAUL HERVIEU
Science et Conscience105
Translation: Science and Conscience106
{xiii}WILLIAM DEAN HOWELLS
The Little Children. Poem17
GÉNÉRAL HUMBERT
Les Arabes avaient Raison109
Translation: An Heroic Stand111
HENRY JAMES
The Long Wards115
FRANCIS JAMMES
Epitaphe. Poem18
Translation: An Epitaph19
GÉNÉRAL JOFFRE
Lettre du Général Joffrevii
Translation: Letter from General Joffreviii
MAURICE MAETERLINCK
Notre Héritage127
Translation: Our Inheritance127
EDWARD SANDFORD MARTIN
We Who Sit Afar Off129
ALICE MEYNELL
In Sleep. Poem20
{xiv}PAUL ELMER MORE
A Moment of Tragic Purgation133
COMTESSE DE NOAILLES
Nos Morts. Poem21
Translation: Our Dead21
JOSEPHINE PRESTON PEABODY
Two Songs of a Year: 1914-1915
I. Children’s Kisses23
II. The Sans-Foyer25
LILLA CABOT PERRY
Rain in Belgium. Poem26
AGNES REPPLIER
The Russian Bogyman139
HENRI DE RÉGNIER
L’Exilé. Poem27
Translation: The Exile28
THEODORE ROOSEVELT
Introductionix
EDMOND ROSTAND
Horreur et Beauté. Poem30
{xv}Translation: Horror and Beauty30
GEORGE SANTAYANA
The Undergraduate Killed in Battle. Poem32
IGOR STRAVINSKY
Musical Score: Souvenir d’une marche boche49
ANDRÉ SUARÈS
Chant des Galloises143
Translation: Song of the Welsh Women147
EDITH M. THOMAS
The Children and the Flag. Poem33
HERBERT TRENCH
The Troubler of Telaro. Poem34
ÉMILE VERHAEREN
Le Printemps de 1915. Poem37
Translation: The New Spring38
MRS. HUMPHRY WARD (Mary A. Ward)
Wordsworth’s Valley in War-time151
BARRETT WENDELL
1915. Poem40
{xvi}EDITH WHARTON
Prefacexix
The Tryst. Poem41
MARGARET L. WOODS
Finisterre. Poem43
W. B. YEATS
A Reason for Keeping Silent. Poem45

.    .
.

The French poems, except M. Rostand’s Sonnet
are translated by Mrs.Wharton

{xvii}

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

CONTRIBUTIONS OF ARTISTS

 FOLLOWING PAGE
LÉON BAKST
Portrait of Jean Cocteau. From an unpublished crayon sketch 8
Ménade. From a water-colour sketch126
MAX BEERBOHM
A Gracious Act. (Caricature.) From a water-colour sketch104
JACQUES-ÉMILE BLANCHE
Portrait of Thomas Hardy. From a photograph of the painting16
Portrait of George Moore. From a photograph of the painting138
Portrait of Igor Stravinsky. From a study in oils46
EDWIN HOWLAND BLASHFIELD
A Woman’s Head. From the original drawing142
LÉON BONNAT
Pegasus. From a pencil and pen-and-ink sketch70
P. A. J. DAGNAN-BOUVERET
Brittany Woman. From a drawing in coloured crayons42
WALTER GAY
Interior. From an original water-colour sketch32
{xviii}J. L. GÉRÔME
Turkish Soldier. From the original pencil drawing made in 1857108
CHARLES DANA GIBSON
“The Girl he left behind Him.” From a pen-and-ink sketch26
ÉMILE-RENÉ MÉNARD
Nude Figure. From a sketch in coloured crayon150
CLAUDE MONET
Landscape. From an early coloured pastel22
Boats on a Beach. From an early crayon drawing100
PIERRE-AUGUSTE RÉNOIR
Portrait of his Son, wounded in the War. From a charcoal sketch64
AUGUSTE RODIN
Two Women. From an original water-colour sketch98
THÉO VAN RYSSELBERGHE
Portrait of André Gide. From a pencil drawing4
Portrait of Émile Verhaeren. From a pencil drawing36
Portrait of Vincent d’Indy. From a photograph of the painting57
JOHN SINGER SARGENT, R.A.
Portrait of Henry James. From a photograph of the painting114
Two Heads. From a pencil drawing132

{xix}

PREFACE

I
THE HOSTELS

Last year, among the waifs swept to Paris by the great torrent of theflight from the North, there came to the American Hostels a littleacrobat from a strolling circus. He was not much more than a boy, and hehad never before been separated from his family or from his circus. Allhis people were mummers or contortionists, and he himself was a meremote of the lime-light, knowing life only in terms of the tent and theplatform, the big drum, the dancing dogs, the tight-rope and thespangles.

In the sad preoccupied Paris of last winter it was not easy to find acorner for this little figure. But the lad could not be left in thestreets, and after a while he was placed as page in a big hotel. He wasgiven good pay, and put into a good livery, and told to be a good boy.He tried ... he really tried ... but the life was too lonely. Nobodyknew anything about the only things he knew, or was particularlyinterested in the programme of the last performance the company hadgiven at Liège or Maubeuge. The little acrobat could not understand. Hetold his friends at the Hostels how lonely and puzzled he was, and theytried to help him. But he couldn’t sleep at night, because he was usedto being up till nearly daylight; and one night he went up to the atticof the hotel, broke open several trunks full of valuables stored

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 ... 21
Comments (0)
Free online library ideabooks.net