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Memoirs of the Reign of King George the Second, Volume 2 (of 3)

Memoirs of the Reign of King George the Second, Volume 2 (of 3)
Title: Memoirs of the Reign of King George the Second, Volume 2 (of 3)
Release Date: 2018-09-05
Type book: Text
Copyright Status: Public domain in the USA.
Date added: 27 March 2019
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TRANSCRIBER’S NOTE

This is Volume 2 of 3. The first volume can be found in ProjectGutenberg at: http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/57016

The List of Illustrations has been copied from Volume I. This listdescribes six illustrations, two in each volume.

As the Editor notes in his Preface in Volume I, “Some, though veryfew, coarse expressions, have been suppressed by the Editor, and thevacant spaces filled up by asterisks.” There is one such occurrencein this volume (on page 205). Some omitted textis indicated by * * * (on page 416.)

The Editor has also inserted the occasional [word] in brackets, whenthat makes the passage more sensible.

Footnote anchors are denoted by [number], and the footnotes have beenplaced at the end of each chapter.

Some minor changes to the text are noted at the end of the book.


MEMOIRS
OF THE REIGN OF
KING GEORGE THE SECOND.

VOL. II.


MR. FOX.
London, Henry Colburn, 1846.

MEMOIRS

OF THE REIGN OF

KING GEORGE THE SECOND.

BY

HORACE WALPOLE,

YOUNGEST SON OF SIR ROBERT WALPOLE, EARL OF ORFORD.


EDITED, FROM THE ORIGINAL MSS.

WITH A PREFACE AND NOTES,

BY THE LATE

LORD HOLLAND.


Second Edition, Revised.

WITH THE ORIGINAL MOTTOES.


VOL. II.


LONDON:
HENRY COLBURN, PUBLISHER,
GREAT MARLBOROUGH STREET.
1847.


[Pg v]

CONTENTS
OF
THE SECOND VOLUME.


CHAPTER I.
  A. D.PAGE
1755.Endeavours for Peace with France in vain2
Duke of Dorset removed; Lord Hartington made Lord-Lieutenant3
Debate on King Charles’s Martyrdomib.
Affair of Sheriffs-Depute in Scotland, and Debates thereon4
Ireland10
History of the Mitchel Election11
Scotch Sheriff-Depute Bill14
History of Earl Poulet18
Preparations for War19
Irelandib.
Preparations for War in France20
King’s Journey to Hanoverib.
Duke of Cumberland at head of Regency21
Prospects of War22
Affairs of Ireland23
CHAPTER II.
1755.Commencement of the War27
War with France28
War in America29
[vi] Author avoids detailing Military events minutely30
Defeat and Death of General Braddock31
Events at Sea32
Spain neutral33
Fears for Hanoverib.
Negotiations at Hanover. Treaties made there34
Dissensions in Ministry and Royal Family36
Disunion of Fox and Pitt37
Affairs of Leicester House39
King arrivesib.
Ministers endeavour to procure support in Parliament41
Fox made Secretary of State43
Resignations and Promotions44
Both Ministers insincere and discontented45
Sir William Johnson’s Victory46
Accession of Bedford Partyib.
The Parliament meets47
Address in Lords48
New Opposition of Pitt, &c.50
Debates on the Treatiesib.
Pitt &c. dismissed62
Sir George Lyttelton Chancellor of the Exchequer63
Complaint of Mr. Fox’s Circular to Members of Parliamentib.
Debate on Fox’s Circular Letter65
Debates on number of Seamen67
CHAPTER III.
1755.Earthquake at Lisbon77
Debates on a Prize Bill78
Death of the Duke of Devonshire86
Debates on the Armyib.
Remarks on the above Debate96
Debates on a new Militia Bill97
[vii] CHAPTER IV.
1755.Debates on the Treaties103
Affair of Hume Campbell and Pitt107
Changes in the Administration settled139
Lord Ligonier and Duke of Marlboroughib.
Further Changes and new Appointments140
Lord Barrington and Mr. Ellis141
Pensions granted to facilitate Changes in Ministry143
Parliamentary Eloquenceib.
History of Oratory. Account and comparison of Orators144
CHAPTER V.
1756.Parliament150
Negotiations with Franceib.
Accommodation with the King of Prussia152
Parliamentib.
Affair of Admiral Knowlesib.
Supplies153
Grants to North America154
Parliament and Partiesib.
Hessians sent for155
Mischiefs produced by Marriage Actib.
Prevot’s Regiment156
Debate on Prevot’s Regiment157
Author’s Speech on Swiss Regiments163
Debate on Swiss Regiments continued170
Affair of Fox and Charles Townshend172
Divisions174
Swiss Regiment Bill opposed in all its stagesib.
Swiss Regiment Bill passed the Commons and Lords175
Anecdote of Madame Pompadour176
Debates on Budget and Taxes177
New Taxesib.
[viii] CHAPTER VI.
1756.Tax on Plate179
Tranquillity restored in Ireland183
Hessians and Hanoverians sent for184
Private Bill for a new Road, and Dissensions thereupon186
Hessians187
Hanoverians188
Debate on Hanoveriansib.
French attack Minorca190
Militia Bill191
Vote of Creditib.
Debates on the Prussian Treaty197
War declared201
Militia Bill in Lordsib.
Parliament Prorogued202
Troops raised by Individuals203
The Prince of Wales of age204
History of Lord Bute’s favourib.
Scheme of taking the Prince from his Mother206
CHAPTER VII.
1756.Minorca209
Character of Richelieu and Blakeney210
Siege of Minorca212
Incapacity of Administration213
Reinforcements from Gibraltar refused214
French Reports from Minorca215
Public Indignationib.
Admiral Byng’s Despatch217
Remarks on the Character of Government218
The Empress-Queen joins with France220
Conclusion of the Law-suit about New Park221
[ix] Continuation of the proceedings with the Prince of Wales221
Death of the Chief Justice Rider, and designation of Murray223
Loss of Minorca225
Proceedings on Loss of Minorca227
General Fowke tried229
Addresses on the Loss of Minorca230
Revolution in Sweden231
Deduction of the Cause of the War in Germany232
German Ministers233
Bruhlib.
Kaunitz234
Views and Conduct of the Courts of Dresden and Vienna235
Character of the Czarina236
League of Russia, Austria, and Saxony238
King of Prussia apprized of the League against himib.
King of Prussia endeavours to secure Peace240
Invasion of Saxony by the King of Prussia241
Dresden Conquered, and the Archives searched by the Prussians242
Campaign in Saxony243
CHAPTER VIII.
1756.Affairs at Home245
Mr. Byng publishes a Defence246
Effect of Byng’s Pamphlet247
Loss of Oswego248
Affair of the Hanoverian Soldier at Maidstoneib.
The King admits Lord Bute into the Prince’s Family249
Fox discontented with Newcastle, and insists on resigning251
Precarious state of the Ministry252
[x] Lord Grenville takes Fox’s resignation to the King253
Fox, irresolute, applies to the Author254
Author’s motives in declining to interfere255
Fox has an Audience256
Pitt’s objections and demands257
Prince of Wales’s new Household258
Pitt visits Lady Yarmouth259
State of Parties260
Duke of Newcastle determines to resign262
Pitt declines acting with Foxib.
Negotiations for the formation of a new Ministry263
Fox labours to obstruct the formation of a Ministry268
The designs of Fox defeated269
Duke of Devonshire accepts the Treasuryib.
New Ministry270
Duke of Newcastle resigns272
The Chancellor resigns273
The changes settled274
Pitt Minister275
Parliament meets276
CHAPTER IX.
1757.Character of the Times278
Contest between the Parliament and Clergy in France279
France280
King of France stabbed281
Torture and execution of Damiens282
The King compliments Louis on his escape283
Trial of Admiral Byng284
Admiral Byng’s sentence, and the behaviour of the Court-Martial287
Author’s impressions288
Sentence of Court-Martial on Byng289
Representation of Court-Martial292
Remarks on Byng’s case293
[xi] Two Highland Regiments raised300
Ordnance Estimates301
Guinea Lotteryib.
Militia Bill302
Ordnance303
CHAPTER X.
1757.Baker’s Contract304
Parliamentary Inquiries limited to Minorca305
Byng’s Sentence produces various impressions306
The Sentence of the Court-Martial referred to the Judges307
Conduct of the Judges on the Case referred to them308
Conduct of Fox309
The Admiralty sign the Sentence311
The Sentence notified to the House of Commons312
Mr. Pitt demands Money for Hanover313
Lord G. Sackville declares for Pitt314
Motives of Lord G. Sackville315
Approaching Execution of Byng317
House of Commons318
Sir Francis Dashwood animadverts on Byng’s Sentenceib.
Debate on Byng’s Sentenceib.
Some applications to the King for mercy326
Members of Court-Martial desirous to be absolved from their Oaths327
Author urges Keppel to apply to House of Commonsib.
Author promotes an application to House of Commons328
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