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Village Folk-Tales of Ceylon (Volume 3 of 3)

Village Folk-Tales of Ceylon (Volume 3 of 3)
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Title: Village Folk-Tales of Ceylon (Volume 3 of 3)
Release Date: 2019-02-14
Type book: Text
Copyright Status: Public domain in the USA.
Date added: 27 March 2019
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[Contents]

VILLAGE FOLK-TALES OF CEYLON

VILLAGE FOLK-TALES OF CEYLON
Vol. III
LONDON
LUZAC & CO.
Publishers to the India Office
1914
[All Rights Reserved]

[v]

[Contents]

CONTENTS

STORIES OF THE CULTIVATING CASTE

NO.PAGE
178 Concerning the Friendship of the Hare and the Parrot 3
179 The Deer and its Friends5
The Deer, the Jackal, and the Crow (Variant a)8
The Rat and the Turtle that kept the Precepts (Variant b) 9
180 The Foolish Bird 13
181 The Golden Oriole 16
182 The Story of the Vīra Tree Fish-Owls 18
183 The Lion and the Bull’s trust in him 22
184 The Lizard and the Iguana 24
185 The Cobra and the Polan̆gā26
The Widow and the Mungus 27
185A The Crab and the Frog 29
186 A Louse and a Bug 30

STORIES OF THE LOWER CASTES

STORIES OF THE POTTERS

187 The Three Yakās 35
188 The Time of Scholars 38

STORIES OF THE WASHERMEN

189 The Thief called Harantikā41
The Dexterous Thief and his Son (Variant) 43
190 The Story of the Four-fold Trap [vi]48
191 The Foolish Prince 52
192 The Jackal and the Gamarāla 54

STORIES OF THE TOM-TOM BEATERS

193 The Story of Batmasurā 57
194 The Story of Ayiwandā 62
195 The Gamarāla’s Son-in-law 71
196 The Story of the Gamarāla’s Son 78
197 The Manner in which the Gamarāla buried his Sons 84
198 The Story of the Wooden Peacock 89
199 The Wicked Step-mother 94
200 The Woman who ate by stealth 99
201 The Story of the Bitch 102
202 The Elephant Guard 106
203 The Elephant-Fool 110
204 The Girl who took Gruel 112
205 The Boy who went to learn the Sciences 115
206 The Prince and the Ascetics 117
207 The Turtle Prince 121
208 The Gem-set Ring 127
209 The Story of the Brāhmaṇa 136
210 The Story of a Siwurāla 141
211 How the Poor Man became Wealthy 144
212 The Story of Mādampē-rāla 146
213 wariyakkā 149
214 The Horikaḍayā Story 152
215 The Story of Bahu-Bhūtayā 155
216 The Story of Goḷu-Bayiyā 158
217 The Yakā of the Akaraganē Jungle 161
218 The Four Rākshasas 166
219 The Story of the Rākshasa 173
220 The Thief and the Rākshasas 176
221 King Gaja-Bāhu and the Crow 183
222 The Assistance which the Snake gave 185
223 The Leveret, or the Story of the Seven Women 187
224 The Greedy Palm-cat 189

[vii]

STORIES OF THE WESTERN PROVINCE AND SOUTHERN INDIA

NO.PAGE
225 The Wax Horse 193
226 The Three-cornered Hatter 200
227 The Gamarāla who went to the God-World207
The Tusk Elephant of the Divine World (Variant) 209
228 The Gamarāla who ate Black Fowls’ Flesh 212
229 How the Gamarāla drove away the Lion 217
230 The Son who was Blind at Night 220
231 The Son and the Mother223
The Wicked Daughter-in-law (Variant) 228
232 Concerning the Heṭṭi Man’s Son 230
233 The Fortunate Boy 234
234 How the Daughter-in-law got the Masuran 240
235 The Monkey and the Beggar 243
236 How the Beggar and the King gambled 249
237 The Story of the King 253
238 The King who learnt the Speech of Animals 258
239 The Mad King261
The Kahawaṇa sowing (Variant) 262
240 Concerning the Prince with his Life in his Sword 265
241 The Royal Prince and the Heṭṭirāla 272
242 Prince Sokkā 285
243 The Affectionate Prince 293
244 The Prince who received the Turtle Shell 300
245 Concerning a Prince and a Kinnara Woman 304
246 The Way in which the Prince traded 310
247 A Princess and a Prince 313
248 Concerning a Royal Princess and Two Thieves 321
249 How the Nāgayā became the Princess 325
250 The Story of the Cobra’s Bite 328
251 How they killed the Great-bellied Tambi 336
252 How Mārayā was put in the Bottle [viii]339
253 The Woman Pre-eminent in Cunning 343
254 Mātalānā 347
255 The Five Lies quite like Truth 352
256 The Three Truths 354
257 The False Tale 355
258 The Story of Koṭā359
The Flower-Garden Story (Variant) 361
259 The Story of Sokkā 367
260 The Giant and his Two Friends 373
261 How they formerly Ate and Drank 380
262 The Gourd Fruit Devil-Dance 384
263 The Ascetic and the Jackal 386

SOUTH INDIAN STORIES

264 Concerning the Blind-Eyed Man 388
265 The Destiny Prince 392
266 The Teacher and his Pupil400
The Teacher and the Bull (Variant a)405
The Brāhmaṇa and the Scholar (Variant b) 407

SINHALESE TEXTS OF STORIES

Introductory Remarks413
81 Concerning a Royal Prince and a Princess 419
126 The Story of the Seven Wicked Women 423
134 The Story of the Rākshasa and the Princess 424
207 The Turtle Prince 426
216 The Story of Goḷu-Bayiyā 429
225 The Wax Horse 430

APPENDIX

ADDITIONAL NOTES, AND CORRECTIONS

Omitted Incidents        457

Index        459[1]

STORIES OF THE CULTIVATING CASTE

[3]

[Contents]

No. 178

Concerning the Friendship of the Hare and the Parrot

In a certain country there are a Hare, and a Mouse-deer, and a Parrot near a river,it is said. The three every day come to the river to drink water.

One day the Parrot said to the Hare, “Friend.”

Then the Hare having said, “What? We two are friends indeed. From our friendship whatwill be the profit? Should you find and give me a mate we should indeed be friends,”afterwards the Parrot said, “If so, stay there until the time when I come [after]finding a mate for you,” and the Parrot drank water and went away.

On the following day, when the Parrot came he met with a Mouse-deer. Having seen theParrot the Mouse-deer says, “Friend, where is your friend?”

The Parrot says, “My friend has not come to-day.”

Then the Mouse-deer says, “What friendship with those Hares! If you become friendlywith us what things cannot we do!”

Then the Parrot says, “Friend, he is [my] former first friend; now then, I cannotabandon him.”

At that the Mouse-deer having become a little angry went away. Having so gone, theMouse-deer, seeking the Hare, says to1 the Hare, “Friend, with that Parrot what friendship! The food which that one eatsis different, the place where that one lies down is different, that one is an animalwhich flies [in the air] above. Are we so? We lie down in one place, we eat one food.Because of it, give up [your] [4]friendship with that one.” At that the Hare became a little angry.

After that, the Mouse-deer, having gone near the Parrot, says, “Take you [to heart]the things that I say, O Parrot-youngster.”

Thereupon the Parrot said, “What, friend?”

The Mouse-deer says, “The sort called Hares at any place whatever are not trusted.”

Then the Parrot asked, “Well then, what are you telling me

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