» » » Macmillan's Reading Books. Book V

Macmillan's Reading Books. Book V

Macmillan's Reading Books. Book V
Category: Readers
Author: Anonymous
Title: Macmillan's Reading Books. Book V
Release Date: 2004-02-01
Type book: Text
Copyright Status: Public domain in the USA.
Date added: 25 March 2019
Count views: 134
Read book
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 ... 42

The Project Gutenberg EBook of MacMillan's Reading Books, by Anonymous

This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and withalmost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away orre-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License includedwith this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.net

Title: MacMillan's Reading Books Book V

Author: Anonymous

Release Date: February 22, 2004 [EBook #11230]

Language: English

*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK MACMILLAN'S READING BOOKS ***

Produced by Juliet Sutherland, Frank van Drogen and PG DistributedProofreaders

MACMILLAN'S

READING BOOKS.
Book V.

STANDARD V.

ENGLISH CODE.

For Ordinary Pass.

Improved reading, and recitation of not less than seventy-five lines ofpoetry.

N.B.—The passages for recitation may be taken from one or more standardauthors, previously approved by the Inspector. Meaning and allusions tobe known, and, if well known, to atone for deficiencies of memory.

For Special Grant (Art. 19, C. 1).

Parsing, with analysis of a "simple" sentence.

SCOTCH CODE.

For Ordinary Pass.

Reading, with expression, a short passage of prose or of poetry, withexplanation, grammar, and elementary analysis of simple sentences.

Specific Subject—English literature and language, 2nd year. (Art. 21and Schedule IV., Scotch Code.)

Three hundred lines of poetry, not before brought up, repeated; withknowledge of meaning and allusions, and of the derivations of words.

PREFACE TO BOOK V.

This seems a fitting place in which to explain the general aim ofthis series of Reading Books. Primarily, it is intended to provide asystematic course for use in schools which are under State inspection;and, with this view, each Book in the series, after the Primer, is drawnup so as to meet the requirements, as set forth in the English andScotch codes issued by the Committees of Council on Education, of theStandard to which it corresponds.

This special adaptation will not, it is hoped, render the series lessuseful in other schools. The graduated arrangement of the books,although, perhaps, one to which every teacher may not choose to conform,may yet serve as a test by which to compare the attainments of thepupils in any particular school with those which, according to thecodes, may be taken as the average expected from the pupils in schoolswhere the Standard examination is, necessarily, enforced.

The general character of the series is literary, and not technical.Scientific extracts have been avoided. The teaching of special subjectsis separately recognised by the codes, and provided for by the numerousspecial handbooks which have been published. The separation of thereading class from such teaching will prove a gain to both. The formermust aim chiefly at giving to the pupils the power of accurate, and,if possible, apt and skilful expression; at cultivating in them a goodliterary taste, and at arousing a desire of further reading. Allthis, it is believed, can best be done where no special or technicalinformation has to be extracted from the passages read.

In the earlier Books the subject, the language, and the moral are allas direct and simple as possible. As they advance, the language becomesrather more intricate, because a studied simplicity, when detectedby the pupil, repels rather than attracts him. The subjects are moremiscellaneous; but still, as far as possible, kept to those which canappeal to the minds of scholars of eleven or twelve years of age,without either calling for, or encouraging, precocity. In Books II.,III., and IV., a few old ballads and other pieces have been purposelyintroduced; as nothing so readily expands the mind and lifts it out ofhabitual and sluggish modes of thought, as forcing upon the attentionthe expressions and the thoughts of an entirely different time.

The last, or Sixth Book, may be thought too advanced for its purpose.But, in the first place, many of the pieces given in it, though selectedfor their special excellence, do not involve any special difficulties;and, in the second place, it will be seen that the requirements of theEnglish Code of 1875 in the Sixth Standard really correspond in somedegree to those of the special subject of English literature, formerlyrecognised by the English, and still recognised by the Scotch Code.Besides this, the Sixth Book is intended to supply the needs of pupilteachers and of higher classes; and to be of interest enough to be readby the scholar out of school-hours, perhaps even after school is donewith altogether. To such it may supply the bare outlines of Englishliterature; and may, at least, introduce them to the best Englishauthors. The aim of all the extracts in the book may not be fullycaught, as their beauty certainly cannot be fully appreciated, byyouths; but they may, at least, serve the purpose of all education—thatof stimulating the pupil to know more.

The editor has to return his thanks for the kindness by which certainextracts have been placed at his disposal by the following authorsand publishers:—Mr. Ruskin and Mr. William Allingham; Mr. Nimmo (forextract from Hugh Miller's works); Mr. Nelson (for poems by Mr. and Mrs.Howitt); Messrs. Edmonston and Douglas (for extract from Dasent's "Talesfrom the Norse"); Messrs. Chapman and Hall (for extracts from the worksof Charles Dickens and Mr. Carlyle); Messrs. Longmans, Green, and Co.(for extracts from the works of Macaulay and Mr. Froude); Messrs.Routledge and Co. (for extracts from Miss Martineau's works); Mr. Murray(for extracts from the works of Dean Stanley); and many others.

BOOK V.

CONTENTS.

Prose.

PREFACE
INTRODUCTION

INCIDENT IN THE LIFE OF DR. JOHNSON Warner's Tour in the Northern
Counties.

THE OLD PHILOSOPHER AND THE YOUNG LADY Jane Taylor

BARBARA S—— Charles Lamb

DR. ARNOLD Tom Brown's School Days

BOYHOOD'S WORK [ditto]

WORK IN THE WORLD [ditto]

CASTLES IN THE AIR Addison

THE DEATH OF NELSON Southey

LEARNING TO RIDE T. Hughes

MOSES AT THE FAIR Goldsmith

WHANG THE MILLER [ditto]

AN ESCAPE Defoe's Robinson Crusoe

NECESSITY THE MOTHER OF INVENTION [ditto]

LABRADOR Southey's Omniana

GROWTH OF EUROPEAN CIVILIZATION IN THE TWELFTH CENTURY Robertson

A WHALE HUNT Scott

A SHIPWRECK Charles Kingsley

THE BLACK PRINCE Dean Stanley

THE ASSEMBLY OF URI E.A. Freeman

MY WINTER GARDEN Charles Kingsley

ASPECTS OF NORTHERN AND SOUTHERN COUNTRIES John Ruskin

COLUMBUS IN SIGHT OF LAND Washington Irving

COLUMBUS SHIPWRECKED [ditto]

ROBBED IN THE DESERT Mungo Park

ARISTIDES Plutarch's Lives

THE VENERABLE BEDE J.R. Green

THE DEATH OF ANSELM Dean Church

THE MURDER OF BECKET Dean Stanley

THE DEATH OF ELIZABETH J.R. Green

THE BATTLE OF NASEBY Defoe

THE PILGRIMS AND GIANT DESPAIR Bunyan

A HARD WINTER Rev. Gilbert White

A PORTENTOUS SUMMER [ditto]

A THUNDERSTORM [ditto]

CHARACTER OF SIR WALTER SCOTT J. Lockhart

MUMPS'S HALL Scott

THE PORTEOUS MOB [ditto]

THE PORTEOUS MOB (continued) [ditto]

JOSIAH WEDGWOOD Speech by Mr. Gladstone

THE CRIMEAN WAR Speech by Mr. Disraeli

NATIONAL MORALITY Speech by Mr. Bright

THE PLEASURES OF A LIFE OF LABOUR Hugh Miller

THE FLIGHT OF BIRDS Rev. Gilbert White

THE BATTLE OF CORUNNA Napier

BATTLE OF ALBUERA Napier

CHARGE OF THE LIGHT BRIGADE AT BALAKLAVA _The "Times" Correspondent

AFRICAN HOSPITALITY Mungo Park

ACROSS THE DESERT OF NUBIA Bruce's Travels

A SHIPWRECK ON THE ARABIAN COAST W.G. Palgrave

AN ARABIAN TOWN W.G. Palgrave

THE QUEST OF THE HOLY GRAIL Sir Thomas Malory

VISIT TO SIR ROGER DE COVERLEY'S COUNTRY SEAT Addison

THE DEAD ASS Sterne

Poetry.

THE VILLAGE BLACKSMITH H.W. Longfellow

MEN OF ENGLAND Campbell

A BALLAD Goldsmith

MARTYRS Cowper

A PSALM OF LIFE H.W. Longfellow

THE ANT AND THE CATERPILLAR Cunningham

REPORT OF AN ADJUDGED CASE Couper

THE INCHCAPE BELL Southey

BATTLE OF THE BALME Campbell

LOCHINVAR Scott

THE CHAMELEON Merrick

A WISH Pope

A SEA SONG Cunningham

ON THE LOSS OF THE 'ROYAL GEORGE' Cowper

RULE BRITANNIA Thomson

WATERLOO Byron

IVRY Macaulay

ANCIENT GREECE Byron

THE TEMPLE OF FAME Pope

A HAPPY LIFE Sir Henry Wotton

MAN'S SERVANTS George Herbert

VIRTUE George Herbert

DEATH THE CONQUEROR James Shirley

THE PASSIONS Collins

THE VISION OF BELSHAZZAR Byron

YE MARINERS OF ENGLAND Campbell

A SHIPWRECK Byron

THE HAPPY WARRIOR Wordsworth

LIBERTY Cowper

THE TROSACHS Scott

LOCHIEL'S WARNING Campbell

REST FROM BATTLE Pope

THE SAXON AND THE GAEL Scott

THE SAXON AND THE GAEL (continued) Scott

THE WINTER EVENING Cowper

MAZEPPA Byron

HYMN TO DIANA Ben Jonson

L'ALLEGRO Milton

THE VILLAGE Goldsmith

THE MERCHANT OF VENICE Shakespeare

IL PENSEROSO Milton

COURTESY Spenser

NOTES

BOOK V.

INTRODUCTION.

Throughout this book, and the next, you will find passages taken fromthe writings of the best English authors. But the passages are not allequal, nor are they all such as we would call "the best," and the moreyou read and are able to judge them for yourselves, the better you willbe able to see what is the difference between the best and those thatare not so good.

By the best authors are meant those who have written most skilfullyin prose and verse. Some of these have written in prose, because theywished to tell us something more fully and freely than they could do ifthey tied themselves to lines of an equal number of syllables, or endingwith the same sound, as men do when they write poetry. Others havewritten in verse, because they wished rather to make us think overand over again about the same thing, and, by doing so, to teachus, gradually, how much we could learn from one thing; if we thinksufficiently long and carefully about it; and, besides this, they knewthat rhythmical or musical language would keep longest in our memoryanything which they wished to remain there; and by being stored up inour mind, would enrich us in all our lives after.

In these books you will find pieces taken from authors both in prose andverse. But of the authors who have made themselves famous by the bookswhich they have written in our language, many had to be set aside.Because many writers, though their books are famous, have written solong ago, that the language which they use, though it is really the samelanguage as our own, is yet so old-fashioned that it is not readilyunderstood. By and by, when you are older, you may read these books, andfind it interesting to notice how the language is gradually changing; sothat, though we can easily understand what our grandfathers or our greatgrandfathers wrote, yet we cannot understand, without carefully studyingit, what was written by our own ancestors a thousand, or even fivehundred, years ago.

The first thing, however, that you have to do—and, perhaps, this bookmay help you to do it—is to learn what is the best way of writing orspeaking our own language of the present day. You cannot learn thisbetter than by reading and remembering what has been written by men,who, because they were very great, or because they laboured very hard,have obtained a great command over the language. When we speak ofobtaining a command over language we mean that they have been able tosay, in simple, plain words, exactly what they mean. This is not so easya matter as you may at first think it to be. Those who write well do notuse roundabout ways of saying a thing, or they might weary us; theydo not use words or expressions which might mean one or other of twothings, or they might confuse us; they do not use bombastic language, orlanguage which is like a vulgar and too gaudy dress, or they might makeus laugh at them; they do not use exaggerated language, or, worse thanall, they might deceive us. If you look at many books which are writtenat the present day, or at many of the newspapers which appear everymorning, you will find that those who write them often forget theserules; and after we have read for a short time what they have written,we are doubtful about what they mean, and only sure that they are tryingto attract foolish people, who like bombastic language as they like toogaudy dress, and are caring little whether what they write is strictlytrue or not.

It is, therefore, very important that you should take as your examplesthose who have written very well

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 ... 42
Comments (0)
Free online library ideabooks.net