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South with Scott

South with Scott
Title: South with Scott
Release Date: 2006-04-07
Type book: Text
Copyright Status: Public domain in the USA.
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The Project Gutenberg eBook, South with Scott, by Edward R. G. R. Evans

This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and withalmost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away orre-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License includedwith this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.org

Title: South with Scott

Author: Edward R. G. R. Evans

Release Date: April 7, 2006 [eBook #18129]

Language: English

***START OF THE PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK SOUTH WITH SCOTT***

E-text prepared by James Tenison

Transcriber's note:

Our author had a very "informal" approach to grammar and syntax; so apparently did his editor. I corrected several obvious errors in the book and listed them at the end of the text. Many more doubtful spellings and countless abbreviations remain as they appear in the text.

I have deleted the symbols for "degree" "minute" and "second" which appear regularly throughout the text and substituted the full word. The symbols + and - in relation to temperature are retained.

SOUTH WITH SCOTT

by

REAR-ADMIRAL EDWARD R. G. R. EVANSC.B., D.S.O, R.N.

Illustrated with Maps and Photographs

London & Glasgow
Collins' Clear-Type Press

To
Lashly and Crean

THIS BOOK IS AFFECTIONATELY DEDICATED

PREFACE

The object of this book is to keep alive the interest of English-speakingpeople in the story of Scott and his little band of sailor-adventurers,scientific explorers, and companions. It is written more particularly forBritain's younger generations.

I have to acknowledge with gratitude the assistance of Miss Zeala
Wakeford Cox of Shanghai and Pay-master Lieutenant-Commander Bernard
Carter of H.M.S. "Carlisle."

Without their help, I doubt if the book would have found its way intoprint.

Edward R.G.R. Evans.
HONG-KONG
February, 27, 1921.

BRITISH ANTARCTIC EXPEDITION, 1910.

PERSONNEL

Shore Parties.

ROBERT FALCON SCOTT Captain, C.V.O., R.N. (The "Owner," "The Boss").
EDWARD R.G.R. EVANS Lieut. R.N. ("Teddy").
VICTOR L.A. CAMPBELL Lieut. R.N. ("The Wicked Mate")
HENRY R. BOWERS Lieut. Royal Indian Marines ("Birdie").
LAWRENCE E.G. OATES Captain 6th Inniskilling Dragoons ("Titus,"
                        "Soldier").
G. MURRAY LEVICK Surgeon R.N.
EDWARD L. ATKINSON Surgeon R.N., Parasitologist ("Atch").

Scientific Staff.

EDWARD ADRIAN WILSON B.A., M.B. (Cantab.), Chief of the Scientific
                        Staff, and Zoologist ("Uncle Bill").
GEORGE C. SIMPSON D.Sc., Meteorologist ("Sunny Jim.")
T. GRIFFITH TAYLOR B.A., B.Sc., B.E., Geologist ("Griff").
EDWARD W. NELSON Biologist ("Marie").
FRANK DEBENHAM B.A., B.Sc., Geologist ("Deb.")
CHARLES S. WRIGHT B.A., Physicist.
RAYMOND E. PRIESTLEY Geologist.
HERBERT G. PONTING F.R.G.S., Camera Artist.
CECIL H. MEARES In charge of dogs.
BERNARD C. DAY Motor Engineer.
APSLEY CHERRY-GARRARD B.A., Asst. Zoologist ("Cherry").
TRYGGVE GRAN Sub.-Lieut. Norwegian N.R., B.A., Ski Expert.

Men.

W. LASHLY C. Stoker, R.N.
W.W. ARCHER Chief Steward, late R.N.
THOMAS CLISSOLD Cook, late R.N.
EDGAR EVANS Petty Officer, R.N.
ROBERT FORDE Petty Officer, R.N.
THOMAS CREAN Petty Officer, R.N.
THOMAS S. WILLIAMSON Petty Officer, R.N.
PATRICK KEOHANE Petty Officer, R.N.
GEORGE P. ABBOTT Petty Officer, R.N.
FRANK V. BROWNING Petty Officer, 2nd Class, R.N.
HARRY DICKASON Able Seaman, R.N.
F.J. HOOPER Steward, late R.N.
ANTON OMELCHENKO Groom.
DIMITRI GEROF Dog Driver.

Ship's Party.

HARRY L. L. PENNELL Lieutenant, R.N.
HENRY E. DE P. RENNICK Lieutenant. R.N.
WILFRED M. BRUCE Lieutenant, R.N.R.
FRANCIS R. H. DRAKE Assistant Paymaster, R.N.(Retired), Secretary and
                        Meteorologist in ship.
DENNIS G. LILLIE M.A., Biologist in ship.
JAMES R. DENNISTOUN In charge of Mules in ship.
ALFRED B. CHEETHAM R.N.R., Boatswain.
WILLIAM WILLIAMS Chief Engine Room Artificer, R.N., Engineer.
WILLIAM A. HORTON Engine Room Artificer, 3rd Class, R.N., 2nd
                        Engineer
FRANCIS E. C. DAVIES Leading Shipwright, R.N.
FREDERICK PARSONS Petty Officer, R.N.
WILLIAM L. HEALD Late Petty Officer, R. N.
ARTHUR S. BAILEY Petty Officer, 2nd Class, R.N.
ALBERT BALSON Leading Seaman, R.N.
JOSEPH LEESE Able Seaman, R.N.
JOHN HUGH MATHER Petty Officer, R.N.V.R.
ROBERT OLIPHANT Able Seaman.
THOMAS F. MCLEOD Able Seaman.
MORTIMER MCCARTHY Able Seaman.
WILLIAM KNOWLES Able Seaman.
CHARLES WILLIAMS Able Seaman.
JAMES SKELTON Able Seaman.
WILLIAM MCDONALD Able Seaman.
JAMES PATON Able Seaman.
ROBERT BRISSENDEN Leading Stoker, R.N.
EDWARD A. MCKENZIE Leading Stoker, R.N.
WILLIAM BURTON Leading Stoker, R.N.
BERNARD J. STONE Leading Stoker, R.N.
AGUS MCDONALD Fireman.
THOMAS MCGILLON Fireman.
CHARLES LAMMAS Fireman.
W.H. NEALE Steward.

CONTENTS

I. SOUTH POLAR EXPEDITION—OUTFIT AND AIMS

II. VOYAGE OF THE "TERRA NOVA"
III. ASSEMBLING OF UNITS—DEPARTURE FROM NEW ZEALAND
IV. THROUGH STORMY SEAS
V. ANTARCTICA—THROUGH THE PACK ICE TO LAND
VI. SETTLING DOWN TO THE POLAR LIFE
VII. ARRANGEMENTS FOR THE WINTER
VIII. THE WINTER CLOSES IN
IX. PRELIMINARY EXPLORATIONS
X. SPRING DEPOT JOURNEY
XI. PREPARATIONS AND PLANS FOR THE SUMMER SEASON
XII. SOUTHERN JOURNEY—MOTOR SLEDGES ADVANCE
XIII. THE BARRIER STAGE
XIV. ON THE BEARDMORE GLACIER AND BEYOND
XV. RETURN OF THE LAST SUPPORTING PARTY
XVI. THE POLE ATTAINED—SCOTT'S LAST MARCHES
XVII. THE SECOND WINTER—FINDING OF THE POLAR PARTY
XVIII. ADVENTURES OF THE NORTHERN PARTY
XIX. NARRATIVE OF THE "TERRA NOVA"

CHAPTER I

SOUTH POLAR EXPEDITION—OUTFIT AND AIMS

It is nine years since the last supporting party bid farewell to CaptainScott and his four brave companions, whose names are still fresh in thememory of those who were interested in Captain Scott's last PolarExpedition. The Great War has come and gone and the majority of us wishto forget it, but the story of Scott undoubtedly appeals still to a greatnumber of people. It is a good story, and my only hope is that I canretell it well enough to make my volume worth while reading after so muchhas already been published concerning the work of the British AntarcticExpedition of 1910.

The main object of our expedition was to reach the South Pole and securefor the British nation the honour of that achievement, but the attainmentof the Pole was far from being the only object in view, for Scottintended to extend his former discoveries and bring back a rich harvestof scientific results. Certainly no expedition ever left our shores witha more ambitious scientific programme, nor was any enterprise of thisdescription ever undertaken by a more enthusiastic and determinedpersonnel. We should never have collected our expeditionary funds merelyfrom the scientific point of view; in fact, many of our largestsupporters cared not one iota for science, but the idea of the Polaradventure captured their interest. On the other hand, a number of oursupporters affected a contempt for the Polar dash and only interestedthemselves in the question of advanced scientific study in the Antarctic.As the expedition progressed, however, the most unenthusiastic member ofthe company developed the serious taste, and in no case did we ever hearfrom the scientific staff complaints that the Naval members failed tohelp them in their work with a zeal that was quite unexpected. Thisapplies more particularly to the seamen and stokers.

Captain Scott originally intended to make his winter quarters in KingEdward VII. Land, but altered the arrangement after the fullestdiscussion with his scientific friends and advisers, and planned that asmall party of six should examine this part of the Antarctic and followthe coast southward from its junction with the Great Ice Barrier,penetrating as far south as they were able, surveying geographically andgeologically. This part of the programme was never carried out, owing tothe ice conditions thereabouts preventing a landing either on the Barrieror in King Edward VII. Land itself.

The main western party Scott planned to command himself, the base to beat Cape Crozier or in McMurdo Sound, near the site of the "Discovery's"old winter quarters at Cape Armitage, the exact position to be governedby the ice conditions on arrival.

Dogs, ponies, motor sledges and man-hauling parties on ski were toperform the Polar journey by a system of relays or supporting parties.Scott's old comrade, Dr. E.A. Wilson of Cheltenham, was selected as chiefof the scientific staff and to act as artist to the expedition. Threegeologists were chosen and two biologists, to continue the study ofmarine fauna and carry out research work in depths up to 500 fathoms. Theexpeditionary ship was to be fitted for taking deep-sea soundings andmagnetic observations, and the meteorological programme included theexploration of the upper air currents and the investigation of theelectrical conditions of the atmosphere. We were fortunate in securing asmeteorologist the eminent physicist, Dr. G. Simpson, who is now head ofthe Meteorological Office in London. Dr. Simpson was to have charge ofthe self-recording magnetic instruments ashore at the main base.

Study of ice structure and glaciation was undertaken by Mr. C.S. Wright,who was also assistant physicist. The magnetic work of the ship wasentrusted to Lieut. Harry Pennell, R.N., an officer of more than ordinaryscientific attainments and a distinguished navigator. Lieut. HenryRennick was given control of the hydrographical survey work and deep-seasounding. Two surgeons were lent by the Royal Navy for the study ofbacteriology and parasitology in addition to their medical duties, andMr. Herbert G. Ponting was chosen as camera artist and cinematographer tothe Expedition.

To my mind the outfit and preparations were the hardest part of our work,for we were

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