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The Charm of Scandinavia

The Charm of Scandinavia
Title: The Charm of Scandinavia
Release Date: 2018-05-06
Type book: Text
Copyright Status: Public domain in the USA.
Date added: 27 March 2019
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The Project Gutenberg eBook, The Charm of Scandinavia, by Francis EdwardClark and Sydney Clark

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Title: The Charm of Scandinavia

Author: Francis Edward Clark and Sydney Clark

Release Date: May 6, 2018 [eBook #57106]

Language: English

Character set encoding: UTF-8

***START OF THE PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK THE CHARM OF SCANDINAVIA***

 

E-text prepared by Bryan Ness
and the Online Distributed Proofreading Team
(http://www.pgdp.net)
from page images generously made available by
Internet Archive
(https://archive.org)

 

Note: Images of the original pages are available through Internet Archive. See https://archive.org/details/charmofscandinav00clarrich

 


 

 

 

[i]

THE CHARM OF SCANDINAVIA

Cover image

[ii]

The Old Borgund Stave-kirke.

Frontispiece. See page 314.


[iii]

THE CHARM
OF SCANDINAVIA

BY
FRANCIS E. CLARK
AND
SYDNEY A. CLARK

ILLUSTRATED

Imprimatur of Little, Brown and Company

BOSTON
LITTLE, BROWN, AND COMPANY
1918

[iv]

Copyright, 1914,
By Little, Brown, and Company.

All rights reserved


[v]

DEDICATED TO
JUDICIA

F. E. C.
S. A. C.

[vi]


[vii]

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

While this book is largely based upon personalobservation in the countries described, the authorshave taken pains to consult many recent andsome older authors who have written about Scandinavia,that they might become familiar with the history andcustoms of the countries which a traveler could nototherwise so readily understand.

Among these authorities may be mentioned Paul DuChaillu’s work on “The Viking Age”; Boyesen’s “Historyof Norway” in the “Story of the Nations” series,a most excellent and informing book, as interestingas it is accurate; Goodman’s “The Best Tour in Norway”;F. M. Butlin’s recent valuable book, “Amongthe Danes”; “Swedish Life in Town and Country,” byOscar G. von Heidenstam; Emil Svenson, Holger Rosman,Gunnar Anderson, and C. G. Lawins, who havecombined to write a handbook about Sweden’s history,industries, social systems, art, etc.

We should like to acknowledge especial indebtednessto a book by Hon. W. W. Thomas, entitled “Swedenand the Swedes.” No American has written so sympatheticallyabout the Swedes from a long and intimateknowledge of them as Mr. Thomas, who as Consul,United States Minister, and private citizen has spentnearly half a century among them. This book, like[viii]Ernest Young’s admirable volume on Finland, has beenused chiefly, as have the other authorities, to confirm,modify, or correct our own impressions.

Since this book is the result of more than one journeythroughout the length and breadth of Scandinavia, thedates appended to the different letters do not necessarilyrefer to the time they were written, but ratherto the season and the part of the country described.

In all essential particulars the book is a record ofthe actual experiences that brought the authors underthe spell of Scandinavia. They hope this story of thesturdy, liberty-loving peoples may impart to the readersomething of the same charm.

F. E. C.
S. A. C.


[ix]

BY WAY OF EXPLANATION

(An introduction which the authors, earnestly but withbecoming modesty, ask their readers to peruse, thatthe scheme of the book may be understood.)

Phillips and Aylmer had engagements which requiredthem to take long journeys in Sweden andNorway, Denmark and Finland, and a friendly discussionarose as to the relative beauties and merits of thesecountries. Aylmer upheld the charms of Norway andDenmark with youthful vehemence, and Phillips, withequal vigor, asserted the superiority of Sweden andFinland. Judicia, to whom they appealed, suggestedthat each one, while on his journey, write her full andinteresting accounts of the things in Scandinavia thatcharmed them most, and she would then render herdecision. But, the letters written, she begged thequestion by proposing that the letters be published,and each reader decide for himself. The writers agreed,and “The Charm of Scandinavia” is the result.


[x]

“To the northward stretched the desert,
How far I fain would know;
So at last I sallied forth,
And three days sailed due north,
As far as the whale ships go.
“The days grew longer and longer,
Till they became as one,
And northward through the haze
I saw the sullen blaze
Of the red midnight sun.”

[xi]

CONTENTS

Page
PART I
Phillips Writes of Sweden and Finland 1
PART II
Aylmer Writes of Norway and Denmark 175

[xii]


[xiii]

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

The Old Borgund Stave-kirke Frontispiece
Facing Page
Map of Scandinavia 1
Skikjoring, a Highly Enjoyable Sport 8
Skate Sailing, a Favorite Sport in Sweden 8
The Royal Palace, Stockholm 16
Tea House on Banks of Mälar 20
Some Girls of Dalecarlia 34
Where Gustavus Adolphus Rests among Hard-Won Battle Flags 42
A Typical Swedish Landscape in Winter 46
Reindeer and Lapps from North Sweden 66
Lion-Guarded Statue of Charles XIII, in King’s Garden, Stockholm 74
The Castle at Upsala 86
The Locks, Borenshult, Göta Canal 96
The Gorge of the Göta at Trölhatten 100
Ruins of St. Nikolaus Cathedral, Visby, Gotland 110
Interior of a Finnish Cottage 136
In Finnish Lakeland 144
In Eastern Finland 150
Fish Harbor, Helsingfors 164
Copenhagen Exchange 182
Watch Parade in Amalienborg Square 196
[xiv]The Splendor of Tivoli on a Gala Night in Summer 196
Frederiksborg Castle, Copenhagen 208
Trondhjem Cathedral 250
On the Sognefjord 256
Ski Jumping 260
The Railroad between Bergen and Christiania 268
Bergen, Northeast from Laksevaag 278
Across the Glassy Geirangerfjord 286
German Battleships in Norwegian Waters 292
A Stolkjaerre 296
Fishermen Arranging their Nets at Balestrand on the Sognefjord 300
Three Little Belles of the Arctic at Tromsö 304
The Hardanger Glacier and Rembesdal Lake 308
View from Hammerfest 310

Transcriber’s note: The map is clickable for a larger version.

NORWAY, SWEDEN AND DENMARK

COPYRIGHT, 1914, BY
THE J. N. MATTHEWS CO., BUFFALO, N. Y.


[1]

THE CHARM OF SCANDINAVIA

PHILLIPS WRITES OF SWEDEN AND FINLAND

FIRST LETTER

In which Phillips descants on his route to Scandinavia from Berlin;on the gastronomic delights of a Swedish railway restaurant; onthe lavish comfort and economy as well as the safety of travelin Sweden; on the quiet charms of the scenery in southernSweden, as well as on the well-earned social position and independenceof the Swedish farmer.

My dear Judicia,

You have brought this upon yourself, you know, forit was your proposition that Aylmer and I should tryto make you feel the charm of Scandinavia as we havefelt it. But do not suppose that we are going to enterupon a contest of wits in order to make our respectivecountries shine upon the written page, or that we aregoing to indulge in high-flown descriptions. We shalltry to tell you of things as we see them; of the peasantin his low-thatched roof, who is as interesting as theking in his palace. We may not even think it beneathour dignity to tell you of the Smörgåsbörd, and of thedifferent kinds of cheese of many colors which gracethe breakfast table, for all these different, homely, commonplacethings enter into the spell of Scandinavia.

[2]

As you know, we started on this long northern journeyat Berlin. This trip has been robbed of all its terrors,since keen competition has compelled the railway andsteamboat companies to exchange the little Dampfschiff,little bigger than tugboats, which used to connect Germanywith Scandinavia, for great ferry steamers, whichtake within their capacious maws whole railway trains,so that now we can go to sleep in Berlin, in a very comfortablesofwagn, and wake up the next morning onSwedish soil, with no consciousness of the fact that inthe middle of the night we had a four hours’ voyageacross a bit of blue sea which is often as stormy as thebroad Atlantic itself.

You remember that I wrote you about a formerjourney across this same bit of water during an equinoctialgale, how our boat was tossed about like a cork,how the port was stove in, and I was washed out of mybunk. Well, last night I was reminded of that formerjourney by contrast, for I never knew when we weretrundled aboard ship at Sassnitz, or when we weretrundled on to

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